Sarabande




Sarabande

The Classical Sarabande Information Page on Classic Cat. In music, the sarabande (It., sarabanda) is a dance in triple metre. The second and third beats of each measure are often tied, giving the dance a distinctive rhythm of quarter notes and eighth notes in alternation. The quarters are said to corresponded with dragging steps in the dance.

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Define sarabande. sarabande synonyms, sarabande pronunciation, sarabande translation, English dictionary definition of sarabande. also sar·a·bande n. 1. A fast, erotic dance of the s of Mexico and Spain. 2. A stately court dance of the s and s, in slow triple time. 3.

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Saraband definition is - a stately court dance of the 17th and 18th centuries resembling the minuet.


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2 Comments

  1. Nikozilkree

    sarabande, originally, a dance considered disreputable in 16th-century Spain, and, later, a slow, stately dance that was popular in France. Possibly of Mexican origin or perhaps evolved from a Spanish dance with Arab influence that was modified in the New World, it was apparently danced by a.

  2. Vimi

    A sarabande is a dance that originated in Central America back in the sixteenth century. It became popular in the Spanish colonies before making its way to Europe. At first, it was regarded as being rather scandalous, even being banned in Spain for its obscenity. Baroque composers, such as Handel, adopted the sarabande as one of the movements.

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